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Pavlovian Conditioning (CUI C0009649) Suggest changes to this concept
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Terms & Properties

Concept Unique Identifier (CUI): C0009649

NCI Thesaurus Code: C41215  (see NCI Thesaurus info)

Semantic Type: Mental Process

NCIt Definition: A classical conditioning procedures that present different stimuli in temporal proximity (contiguity), but where resulting responses have no reinforcing or aversive consequences. Named after the author of the experiments (Dr. I. Pavlov) in which dogs were conditioned to salivate at the sound of a tone.

MSH Definition: Learning that takes place when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus.

GO Definition: Learning by associating a stimulus (the cause) with a particular outcome (the effect). [ISBN:0582227089]

Synonyms & Abbreviations: (see Synonym Details)
associative learning
Classical Conditionings
classical conditioning
conditional learning
conditional response
Conditioning, Classical
Conditionings, Classical
Pavlovian conditioning

External Source Codes: 
NCI Thesaurus Code C41215 (see NCI Thesaurus info)

Other Properties: Property Definitions
Name Value Source
AQL CL DE ES PH RE MSH
DC 1 MSH
DID 2483-1903 CSP
DX 19730101 MSH
GO_NAMESPACE biological_process GO
GXR Wikipedia:Learning#Associative_learning GO
HN 73(66); REFLEX, CONDITIONED was heading 1963-72 MSH
MDA 19990101 MSH
MMR 19980610 MSH
MN F02.463.425.179.308 MSH
OL use CONDITIONING, CLASSICAL to search REFLEX, CONDITIONED 1966-72 MSH
PM 73; was REFLEX, CONDITIONED 1963-72 MSH
SOS Classical conditioning focuses on the way in which responses (often involuntary responses, such as salivation, heart rate, blood pressure, or aspects of emotion a person has no control over) may be evoked by particular stimuli (i.e., objects or events). Classical conditioning is based on an existing pattern where an unconditioned stimulus (US; often a "biologically active" stimulus, such as food) evokes an involuntary unconditioned response (UR), such as salivation, and, using that pattern, seeks to establish a pattern where a different stimulus, called the conditioned (or learned) stimulus (CS, usually a "biologically neutral" stimulus that does not evoke a significant response, such as the ringing of a bell), evokes a conditioned or learned response (CR, often the same as the UR). In a classical conditioning trial, the conditioned stimulus is repeatedly followed by the unconditioned stimulus; the probability of the unconditioned stimulus is much higher once the conditioned stimulus was presented (the US is contingent on the CS). The unconditioned stimulus evokes the unconditioned response. After sufficient repetition, the conditioned stimulus alone evokes the conditioned response. In brief, the US is made contingent on the CS and, as a consequence, the CS acquires the capacity to elicit a CR. The conditioned or learned response, which may be different from the unconditioned response, is often an adaptive response in anticipation of the unconditioned stimulus. AOD
SOS In classical conditioning, a stimulus that was previously neutral, by occurring shortly before or contiguous with another stimulus, comes to elicit the response of the latter. AOD
SOS Learned behavior or the experimental paradigm or procedure used to develop and evoke classically conditioned responses. (PsychInfo, 6th ed.) (scope note from first edition) AOD
TERMUI T009376 MSH
TH NLM (1966) MSH

Additional Concept Data:  (none)

URL to Bookmark: https://ncim-stage.nci.nih.gov/ncimbrowser/ConceptReport.jsp?dictionary=NCI Metathesaurus&code=C0009649

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